Minority Health

A Different Kind of Leader

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A Different Kind Leader

Giselle Corbie, M.D., MSc
Kenan Distinguished Professor of Social Medicine
Director, Center for Health Equity Research
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

As a female scholar of color, early in my career I often sought out leaders that embodied the characteristics that I hoped to cultivate throughout my career—a different way of leading that harnesses the power of diverse perspectives. More recently, I began reflecting on the early days of my career and wished my younger self had had access to the insights and pieces of wisdom from leaders from diverse backgrounds. While I do not have the ability to time travel, I do have a voice and passion for telling the stories of diverse leaders. It was realizing that there was still a void that those voices could fill that led to the creation of the podcast A Different Kind of Leader. For over two years, four seasons, and 48 episodes, A Different Kind of Leader (DKL) has been dedicated to featuring incredible, diverse leaders and their journeys, insights, and experiences in their personal and leadership journey. In this day and age, the problems that our organizations face are complex, and we benefit from having as many perspectives and voices as possible to help develop the most creative and sustainable solutions.

Continue reading “A Different Kind of Leader”

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The COVID-19 Pandemic Has Amplified the Effects of Racism on Mental Health

The COVID-19 Pandemic Has Amplified the Effects of Racism on Mental Health blog post
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Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D.
Marie Ward Doty University Chair in Ethics
Professor of Psychology
Director, Center for Ethics Education
Director, HIV/Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Institute
Fordham University

Social Card for Insights Blog postPeople from racial and ethnic minorities in the United States have borne a disproportionately higher burden of COVID-19 infection and mortality. During the pandemic, depression and anxiety among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN), Asian, Black, and Hispanic people have also increased. These disparities are rooted in long-standing racial and ethnic inequities in medical and behavioral health treatment utilization and access to culturally relevant health services.

Racial discrimination has long been documented as a psychosocial stressor among racial and ethnic minority individuals and national surveys indicate racism increased during the current pandemic. During the pandemic racially and ethnically marginalized persons in the U.S. were also more likely to be employed in the health care work force or as frontline workers in industries such as food services, pharmacies, personal care and public transportation. Employment in these positions not only increased risk of COVID-19 infection, but increased public perception that racial and ethnic groups were more likely to be infected with the coronavirus. Simultaneously, the U.S, saw an upsurge in racially based hate crimes, particularly directed against Asian Americans. The surge in racial bias and violence underscores the urgency of studying the effects of pandemic-related forms of victimization and discrimination on the mental health of racial and ethnic youth and adults in the U. S. Continue reading “The COVID-19 Pandemic Has Amplified the Effects of Racism on Mental Health”

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Big Problems, Big Data, Bigger Possibilities in Health Disparities Research

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No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created it. – Albert Einstein

By Nancy Breen, Ph.D.
Economist
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Photo of Dr. Nancy BreenWhile at NIMHD, I was asked to lead the Methods and Measurement Science pillar, one of four pillars of the NIMHD Visioning Process. The tasks of this pillar were to establish definitions, harmonize outcomes, and present scientific insights. The objectives were to expand and strengthen analytic methods and to offer guidelines for consistent measurement.  Results are published the NIMHD AJPH Supplement, New Perspectives to Advance Minority Health and Health Disparities Research. Health disparity outcome measures are defined in “Overview”1, “Methodological Approaches to Understanding Causes of Health Disparities” are emphasized2, and recommendations are offered for “Harmonizing Health Disparities Measurement”3.  Evaluation4, an under-used tool in health disparities research, is encouraged with guidelines provided. This blog enhances findings from “Translational Health Disparities Research in a Data-Rich World”5.

The role of big data in health disparities research is a burning question.  Our interdisciplinary team explored how big data can contribute to reducing health disparities. The collaboration resulted in years of challenging and productive transdisciplinary teamwork that yielded two articles6,7 and the editorial for NIMHD’s AJPH Supplement, New Perspectives to Advance Minority Health and Health Disparities Research5. Continue reading “Big Problems, Big Data, Bigger Possibilities in Health Disparities Research”

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Storytelling Through Narrative Medicine: Measuring the Lived-Experiences of Black Women’s Reproductive Health

Storytelling Through Narrative Medicine: Measuring the Lived-Experiences of Black Women’s Reproductive Health
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By Shameka Poetry Thomas, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow
NIH Intramural Research Program
Health Disparities Unit
Social and Behavioral Research Branch
National Human Genome Research Institute

Dr. Shameka Poetry Thomas

Dr. Shameka Poetry Thomas

My grandmother was a traditional healer and a medicine-woman in Georgia’s rural South. Although I grew up in Miami’s Opa-Locka (a small urban neighborhood tucked between Miami-Gardens and the cusp of Hialeah / Little Havana), I spent most summers near middle Georgia’s farmland, listening to my grandmother. I observed how grandmother, who did not have a Ph.D., gathered Black women in circles. She described the process of listening to Black women’s pregnancies, births, and wellness experiences as “chitchatting and holding space.

Learning how to ‘hold space’ is what draws me to narrative medicine. My first dose of learning how to conduct narrative medicine, I suppose, came from my grandmother. This methodology (before I knew it was such) was simply understood as the process of sitting in kitchens and beauty salons in the South—just listening. During childhood, I was merely curious about how Black women described their pregnancies, births, and reproductive health—from their side of the story. Thus, when it came to reproductive health, my grandmother taught me a powerful tool: how to “hold space” for people’s narratives. Continue reading “Storytelling Through Narrative Medicine: Measuring the Lived-Experiences of Black Women’s Reproductive Health”

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Heartfelt Thanks to the NIMHD Scientific Community in the Time of COVID-19

NIMHD leadership say thank you
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Co-authored by
Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable, M.D.
Director, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Monica Webb Hooper, Ph.D.
Deputy Director, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

NIMHD leadership say thank you

As leaders of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD), we want to express our sincerest thanks to the NIMHD scientific community and staff for their efforts as we continue to experience the most challenging public health crisis in over a century. Your rapid-response efforts to document, understand, and address the undue burden of COVID-19 among populations with health disparities—the very groups already dealing with longstanding disparities in life expectancy and overall well-being—have not gone unnoticed. We deeply appreciate your unwavering commitment to research designed to uncover the causes of health disparities, develop interventions to address them, and promote health equity.

Since March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic has radically affected us in our daily lives—as individuals, families, and as members of the biomedical research workforce. We have all had to manage unfathomable adjustments and elevated stress both personally and professionally. The pandemic has disproportionately affected the lives and livelihoods of populations that experience health disparities in even more pronounced ways. And these groups—racial and ethnic minority communities, socioeconomically disadvantaged persons, people who live in rural underserved areas and sexual and gender minority persons—are prioritized by NIMHD. Continue reading “Heartfelt Thanks to the NIMHD Scientific Community in the Time of COVID-19”

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NIH’s Minority Health and Health Disparities Strategic Plan 2021-2025: A Path to the Future

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NIH’s Minority Health and Health Disparities Strategic Plan

By Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable, M.D.
Director, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Photo of Dr. Eliseo J. Perez-Stable, NIMHD DirectorThe COVID-19 pandemic has brought minority health and health disparities new attention on the national stage. COVID-19 has disproportionately affected African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, and Latinos and Latinas.

This is a microcosm of the health equity challenge that plagues the U.S.

As in most conditions with health disparities, the causes are complex. People from some of these groups are less likely to have health insurance than Whites. Inequities in access to quality education and limited economic opportunities for many, mean that many minority groups are disproportionately represented among the ranks of essential workers, such as those who work in farms, grocery stores, and support staff in health care settings and long-term care facilities, and less able to avoid the virus at work than people who work in office jobs. Continue reading “NIH’s Minority Health and Health Disparities Strategic Plan 2021-2025: A Path to the Future”

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National Minority Mental Health Month: Reflections and Resources

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stock image of minorities in counseling circleMental illness does not discriminate, and more than 40 million Americans experience them each year regardless of race, ethnicity, gender identity, or socioeconomic status. July is National Minority Mental Health Month—a time to raise awareness about the unique psychological struggles that people from racial and ethnic minority communities face.

For National Minority Mental Health Month, NIMHD is sharing reflections and resources about the challenges, stigma, and access to mental health providers minorities often experience. We encourage you to educate yourself, your families, and your communities about mental health and emotional wellbeing. Continue reading “National Minority Mental Health Month: Reflections and Resources”

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A Black Doctor and Scientist on Vaccinating Minorities

Photo of Dr. Roderic I. Pettigrew getting a COVID-19 vaccine
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NOTE: For National Minority Health Month, NIMHD Insights Blog is sharing this timely op-ed that was printed with permission from the Houston Chronicle from former and founding Director of NIH’s National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Dr. Roderic I. Pettigrew.

By Roderic I. Pettigrew, Ph.D., M.D.
CEO of Engineering Health

Executive Dean of Engineering Medicine
Texas A&M University and Houston Methodist Hospital
Former and Founding Director, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Photo of Dr. Roderic I. Pettigrew getting a COVID-19 vaccine

Dr. Roderic I. Pettigrew getting his COVID-19 vaccine

When it was first announced that a COVID-19 vaccine was authorized for emergency use by the Federal Drug Administration in the United States, the scientific community was finally able to exhale. As a Black physician and member of the scientific community, I was particularly encouraged because of the disproportionately higher rates of hospitalizations and deaths from COVID-19 among the Hispanic, Black, and Indigenous American populations.

My relief, however, was short-lived. We continue to see troubling inequities with new reports showing that many people from the minority community are among the lowest currently receiving the new vaccines, and the highest to be hesitant about its safety and effectiveness. According to Pew Research Center1, just 42 percent of Black adults are inclined to get vaccinated, compared to 63 percent of white adults and 83 percent of adult Asian Americans.

Continue reading “A Black Doctor and Scientist on Vaccinating Minorities”

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NIMHD 10: A Year in Review and a Path Forward

Photo of Dr. Eliseo J. Perez-Stable, NIMHD Director
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By Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable, M.D.
Director, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Photo of Dr. Eliseo J. Perez-Stable, NIMHD DirectorIn 2020, we celebrated NIMHD’s 10th anniversary as an institute at the National Institutes of Health. As the year began, we could not have foreseen the disruptions and devastation that a global pandemic would cause. Although many would say we could have predicted the exacerbation of health disparities among racial and ethnic minorities and all working people with the onset of COVID-19, its impact has revealed so much about the inequities within the fabric of our nation. While the nation (and the world) grappled with how best to deal with our new public health crisis, NIMHD pressed ahead to be a part of the solutions. We expanded the breadth and depth of our work with new collaborations, research programs and resources in support of our mission to improve minority health and reduce health disparities.

Before the pandemic shut the nation down, we were fortunate to hold NIMHD’s first scientific symposium, marking our milestone year, hosting over 2,000 in-person and virtual attendees. Focusing on themes of partnership, innovation, and the role of social and health determinants in health disparities, we created a path for further exploration and research initiatives. Continue reading “NIMHD 10: A Year in Review and a Path Forward”

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The Power of Trust and Truth

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Getting and sharing the facts about COVID-19, trusting science can help turn tide for pandemic-strapped communities of color

NOTE: This post originally appeared as an Op-Ed on BlackDoctor.org and in La Vision Newspaper

Co-authored by
Gary H. Gibbons, M.D., Director National Heart, Lung, Blood Institute
Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable, M.D., Director National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

COVID-19 has killed more than 230,000 people in the U.S., and the death toll continues to rise at a rate of about 1,000 per day [see recent data at CDC]. We know, however, that families and communities don’t count their losses in thousands or hundreds; they count them one-by-one – a father, a teacher, a sister, a friend, a nurse, a son, a Tribal elder, a church member. And these losses hurt. Continue reading “The Power of Trust and Truth”

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